Auto-aggressive behavior in dental patients

Authors

  • Aneta Olszewska Division of Facial Malformation, Dental Surgery Department, Poznań University of Medical Sciences
  • Agata Daktera-Micker Division of Facial Malformation, Dental Surgery Department, Poznań University of Medical Sciences
  • Katarzyna Cieślińska Division of Facial Malformation, Dental Surgery Department, Poznań University of Medical Sciences
  • Ewa Firlej Division of Facial Malformation, Dental Surgery Department, Poznań University of Medical Sciences
  • Barbara Biedziak Division of Facial Malformation, Dental Surgery Department, Poznań University of Medical Sciences

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.20883/jms.2017.210

Keywords:

auto-aggression, behavior, dentistry

Abstract

Auto-aggression can be defined as all actions that aim to inflict mental or physical harm to oneself. It can be caused by a dysfunction of the self-preservation instinct, which can manifest in life-threatening self-mutilation tendencies. Auto-aggression can also be one of the symptoms of psychiatric or emotional dysfunctions such as borderline personality disorder, psychopathy or schizophrenia. A dental appointment, being usually a source of great stress, can induce certain auto-aggressive behaviors as well as dental examination can show some lesions or abnormal changes of anatomical structures in the oral cavity which should be thoroughly examined and treated multidisciplinary according to patient’s behavior.

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Published

2017-03-27

How to Cite

1.
Olszewska A, Daktera-Micker A, Cieślińska K, Firlej E, Biedziak B. Auto-aggressive behavior in dental patients. JMS [Internet]. 2017 Mar. 27 [cited 2024 Jun. 21];86(1):65-8. Available from: https://jms.ump.edu.pl/index.php/JMS/article/view/210

Issue

Section

Review Papers
Received 2017-02-28
Accepted 2017-03-16
Published 2017-03-27