Medical students’ awareness of radiation exposure related to radiological imaging procedures

  • Katarzyna Jończyk-Potoczna Department of Pediatric Radiology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poland
  • Lidia Strzelczuk-Judka Department of Pediatric Radiology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poland
  • Ewa Szłyk Department of Pediatric Radiology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poland Student Scientific Circle of Pediatric Radiology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poland
  • Łucja Stefaniak Department of Pediatric Radiology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poland Student Scientific Circle of Pediatric Radiology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poland
Keywords: medical students, ionising radiation, radiological protection

Abstract

Introduction. Current advancements in fields of medical sciences resulted in an increase of imaging examinations with a use of ionising radiation. Such increase leads to justified concerns about its possible consequences.Aim. Assessment of awareness and level of knowledge of medicine students in terms of ionising radiationMaterial and methods. Statistical analysis of 207 surveys of medical students from University of Medical Sciences in Poznan (UMP), Poland with use of Statistica softwareResults. There was no significant difference between the results of the assessment related to gender, year of studies or attendance to radiology classes. Conclusions. Students level of knowledge about the ionising radiation was unsatisfactory. A change in training program can be a benefit for patients and physicians.

References

Brenner D, et al. Estimated risks of radiation-induced fatal cancer from pediatric CT. AR Am J Roentgenol. 2001;176(2):289–96.

Pearce MS, et al. Radiation exposure from CT scans in childhood and subsequent risk of leukaemia and brain tumours: a retrospective cohort study. Lancet. 2012; 380:499–505.

Mathews JD, et al. Cancer risk in 680 000 people exposed to computed tomography scans in childhood or adolescence: data linkage study of 11 million Australian. BJ. 2013;346:f2360.

Leenhouts HP, Chadwick KH. The molecular basis of stochastic and nonstochastic effects. Health Phys. 1989;57 (Suppl 1):343–8.

Little J, et al. Radiation carcinogenesis. Carcinogenesis. 2000;21(3):397–404.

Mc Laughlin PD, et al. Minimization of Radiation Exposure due to Computed Tomography in Inflammatory Bowel Disease ISRN Gastroenterol. 2012;2012:790–279.

OSullivan J, et al. An assessment of medical students’ awareness of radiation exposures associated with diagnostic imaging investigations. Insights Imaging. 2010 May;1(2): 86–92.

Shiralkar S, et al. Doctors' knowledge of radiation exposure: questionnaire study. BJ. 2003 Aug 16;327(7411):371–2.

Wong CS, et al. A questionnaire study assessing local physicians, radiologists and interns’ knowledge and practice pertaining to radiation exposure related to radiological imaging. Eur J Radiol. 2012 Mar;81(3):e264–8.

Keijzers GB, Britton CJ. Doctors’ knowledge of patient radiation exposure from diagnostic imaging requested in the emergency department. Med J Aust. 2010;193(8): 450–453.

Jacob K1, Vivian G, Steel JR. X-ray dose training: are we exposed to enough? Clin Radiol. 2004 Oct;59(10):928–34.

Singh RK, et al. Teaching medical students about radiation protection – what do they need to know? Clin Radiol. 2008 Dec;63(12):1344–9.

Hagi SH, Medical student’s knowledge of ionizing radiation and radiation protection. Saudi Med J. 2011;32(5): 179–83.

Published
2016-02-17
How to Cite
Jończyk-Potoczna, K., Strzelczuk-Judka, L., Szłyk, E., & Stefaniak, Łucja. (2016). Medical students’ awareness of radiation exposure related to radiological imaging procedures. Journal of Medical Science, 83(3), 244-249. Retrieved from http://jms.ump.edu.pl/index.php/JMS/article/view/74
Section
Original Papers